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This Land Is Our Land

A History of American Immigration

by Linda Barnett Osborne

eBook

American attitudes toward immigrants are paradoxical. On the one hand, we see our country as a haven for the poor and oppressed; anyone, no matter his or her background, can find freedom here and achieve the "American Dream." On the other hand, depending on prevailing economic conditions, fluctuating feelings about race and ethnicity, and fear of foreign political and labor agitation, we set boundaries and restrictions on who may come to this country and whether they may stay as citizens. This book explores the way government policy and popular responses to immigrant groups evolved throughout U.S. history, particularly between 1800 and 1965. The book concludes with a summary of events up to contemporary times, as immigration again becomes a hot-button issue. Includes an author's note, bibliography, and index.


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Publisher: ABRAMS

Kindle Book

  • Release date: April 12, 2016

OverDrive Read

  • ISBN: 9781613129272
  • File size: 21027 KB
  • Release date: April 12, 2016

EPUB eBook

  • ISBN: 9781613129272
  • File size: 21027 KB
  • Release date: April 12, 2016


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Formats

Kindle Book
OverDrive Read
EPUB eBook

Languages

English

Levels

ATOS Level:7.9
Interest Level:4-8(MG)
Text Difficulty:6

American attitudes toward immigrants are paradoxical. On the one hand, we see our country as a haven for the poor and oppressed; anyone, no matter his or her background, can find freedom here and achieve the "American Dream." On the other hand, depending on prevailing economic conditions, fluctuating feelings about race and ethnicity, and fear of foreign political and labor agitation, we set boundaries and restrictions on who may come to this country and whether they may stay as citizens. This book explores the way government policy and popular responses to immigrant groups evolved throughout U.S. history, particularly between 1800 and 1965. The book concludes with a summary of events up to contemporary times, as immigration again becomes a hot-button issue. Includes an author's note, bibliography, and index.


Expand title description text